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ENTERTAINMENT

Barry Gibb on Going From ‘Night Fever’ to Nashville: ‘Country Is What I Will Do From Here On Out’

https://variety.com/2021/music/news/barry-gibb-bee-gees-interview-greenfields-1234883040/

Barry Gibb on Going From ‘Night Fever’ to Nashville: ‘Country Is What I Will Do From Here On Out’

“Look at the world out there.”

Barry Gibb is alluding to the several days of strife that accompanied Donald Trump’s most recent insurrection against the U.S. government. With a heavy sigh, however, the legend and last remaining Bee Gee was talking about the deaths of his brothers, Andy, Maurice and Robin, the joys and pains of brotherhood, the ups, downs and changing sounds within a long career (the Bee Gees commenced in 1958), and the newest projects in his life: an HBO documentary “The Bee Gees: How Can You Mend a Broken Heart,” and a new solo (sort-of) album, “Greenfields — The Gibb Brothers’ Songbook Vol. 1.”

“People need real songs and to feel real emotions with a bit of romance, a sentimentality that has evaporated from our society,” says Gibb of “Greenfields’” gentle recollection of his and his brothers’ past. “People still want songs they’ll never forget. That’s my objective – to keep the music alive. People may not remember us, but I want them to remember the songs.”
Filled with the country influences of his youth, as well as drawing from the new school of Nashville via producer Dave Cobb and duet partners such as Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell and Keith Urban, Gibb is more than proud of his latest achievement.


“With all this,  I am a country singer,” he says, matter-of-factly.  “Country is what I will do from here on out,  as long as I can make music.”

VARIETY: It’s everyone’s understanding that you haven’t watched the HBO documentary, and yet you participated in it by doing in-depth interviews. Why and why?


GIBB: Of course. I did everything that I was supposed to do, and told everyone how I thought everything had been in our lives, mine and my brothers’ — but I can’t watch my family fade away in front of me. You know? It’s just one of those things. I made my comments and hope others enjoy it. The response has been amazing, so I’m happy about that.

Though the documentary doesn’t delve too deeply in the hows of the trio’s fall from grace post-“Saturday Night Fever” or “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” it does focus on what the filmmakers felt was latent homophobia and racism at having dance music records burned, yours included. What’s your take?

I think that there’s some truth to that. It’s not up to me to say what is racist or homophobic, but I do know that somebody was trying to do something to it. The music would have evolved on its own. I don’t know why anyone thought that was a good idea. I hadn’t really thought about it since it all happened, and we weren’t the only artists, but I liken record burning to book burning. Once you think that you have the right to do that, you’re already problematic to society. That said, I don’t think much about that much, now. It was 40 years ago. I’m happy it was 40 years ago.


One thing to be gleaned from “Greenfields,” beyond a love of country and bluegrass, is how dedicated you are to its naturalism, and to being there now. It is a very present album.

I’m up for anything as long as I have the energy to do it. When you are 30 and younger, it’s a case of animal energy. You’ll travel as far as you have to to please the people you want to please. The greatest fun in life is writing for somebody. For something. When we wrote for Robert Stigwood, if he approved, he was going to act on it. It was a matter of people you believed in, as much as they believed in you. Those are the things I sort of miss. What I’m left with is writing for myself — to please myself, my wife, my family. I don’t look to an entity to approve or disapprove of what I’m doing. And somehow, within all this, I have become a country artist — a music I love with all my heart. It doesn’t matter what happened in the past. In my heart, this where I know I belong. The shock was that the artists who appear on “Greenfields” said yes.

Your humility is admirable, but it’s hard to imagine someone turning you down. Keith Urban killed “To Love Somebody” already (during CBS’ “Stayin’ Alive: A Grammy Salute to the Music of the Bee Gees” from 2017), and dueting with you now on “I’ve Gotta Get a Message to You”… he’s a champion of your stuff.


Keith is a perennial, already a legend. I think his voice is like Robin’s in a number of ways. He did that song perfectly.

But did you really think that you wouldn’t find collaborators?


No. I did not, Quite the opposite. This was a dream. My son played me records by guys like Chris Stapleton, and from there I became a fan of Americana. I’ve worked in and out of Nashville for a number of years, and with Ricky Skaggs. I did several (Grand Old) Oprys, and worked the Ryman a couple of times. I’m truly bitten. To be able to play a song is truly something. You know, you mentioned the eras of the ’70s and the ’80s. There’s been a lot of years gone by when it was no longer a big deal to have a great song out there. The hits go by so quickly now you barely have a chance to remember them. When I started the ‘Greenfields’ process I was looking for artists who actually liked our songs and chose one. I didn’t choose the songs, you know? My eldest son Steven went to Nashville, collaborated with Jay Landers who worked with me on the Barbra Streisand albums, and took the helm — courted country artists that I loved. With Dolly (Parton)? She and I have a longstanding friendship, but Alison Krauss. Miranda Lambert… My God. I’ve been fortunate. You can’t count on everybody. I’m delighted as to who said yes. Chris Stapleton wanted to do it but he had just come off the road.

Maybe next time. In terms of solo albums, there’s “Now Voyager.” You shelved “The Kid’s No Good,” and morphed “Moonlight Madness” into the soundtrack for “Hawkes.” Eventually, you did “In the Now” in 2016. Doing anything away from the Bee Gees — your brothers didn’t have a positive consensus on all that.

Robin did several albums and was intense about having a solo career in what was a naturally competitive spirit between us anyway, but yeah, it was all a bit of a jumble. If I wanted to do anything solo, somebody was always quick to throw up a boulder to stop that. They wanted the Bee Gees to be in the studio, not just one of us out there. There was the politics of the business too. Robin and I could have done more solo, but the work — the brand — of what the Bee Gees took precedence. My personal joy came with working with Streisand, Diana Ross, Dionne Warwick. That’s what led me to the new album. I love other people singing our songs. You work all your life to have artists of the caliber that fill “Greenfields” doing your material. We got it together in a month. I hope to God there’s a Volume 2 and 3. But, it’s always going to be country, and it’s always going to be Nashville. I’d like to see “For Whom the Bell Tolls” and “I Started a Joke” done in that vein. There’s a lot of country in those songs.

That’s where your heart is now.


Yeah. You know, you wander around this industry for years. You think one thing is right for you. Then you think that something else is next. This is where I’ve landed. And it’s right. See, I’m alone now as an artist. I can at least choose the thing that I want to do.

You’re alone now, and yet you have chosen duets for “Greenfields.” I’m no psychiatrist, but that seems as if you’re looking for something more communal, still.

That’s a fair observation, but this wasn’t supposed to be duets. The project was originally the people I admired the most singing our songs. Not me. It wasn’t my intention. With that, Dave Cobb and I were not always on the same page. Dave wanted duets. I wanted to let them sing and (myself) do a cameo, here or there. To me, that was more fun. In the end, however, everyone wanted to do a duet. I just fell in line, and was delighted to do so.

How did you hook up with Cobb? 

I love his work. My son played me a Chris Stapleton track, (and I) said “Oh my God’ out loud and wanted to know who produced it. I didn’t want to co-produce. I wanted Dave to produce me. It’s brought me back to real recording with real musicians, not programming stuff, with which I’m done. I wanted to get back to something pure. If you can’t play it, you don’t belong. That means you have to deliver. It’s like our childhood. When my brothers and I were doing television shows, there was no tape, it was live; you had to deliver. I’m back to that. Plus, Dave is like me in the ’70s. Rather than sit back, he is involved in the studio, playing and whatnot. A great cheerleader and a great umpire. If didn’t agree with Cobb, he’d cool my heels, and I’d go “OK.”

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Barry Gibb (right) with “Greenfields” producer Dave Cobb in Nashville
Becky Fluke

Your vocals are still airy and beautiful. There’s also something there that’s heavier, rougher, more spectral… even spooky. How are you hearing your voice, and how it applies?

I’m not a kid, anymore. I still think my chops are there. I don’t use the falsetto as much as I enjoy doing, because there’s no purpose to that now. I’m happy to sing in a more natural voice now — the rest of it is all history. I do love Frankie Valli, Brian Wilson, the Stylistics, the Manhattans. But where my voice is now goes back to my youth. Bluegrass. Skiffle. There was always country music in our songs, the Bee Gees.

What was the toughest or most rewarding song to get through?

To be honest, “Rest Your Love on Me,” with Olivia (Newton John). She cut it years ago with Andy. Conway Twitty had a hit with it. I always wanted to do the song with her in the first place… When we got into the studio, she was instant. Same with Brandi (Carlile) and Alison (Krauss). Instant. Sheryl Crow. Instant. Two or three takes and it was there. Cobb wants the final vocal when you cut the track. He wants you to nail it when you’re doing it for the sake of spontaneity. I’m not used to working that way so that could be tough. I’ve spent two weeks at a time before this on a vocal. Not him. That’s exciting.


“The Words of a Fool,” a stirring solo track of yours from the ’80s, done here with Jason Isbell, is the best thing on “Greenfields,” but is probably the least known of your songs as it speaks of Christian faith with enormous potency.

I wrote that during a time of crisis with Robert Stigwood. Don’t remember all the details, but I used to sing it during soundchecks for our shows. I loved singing that song. I always promised myself that one day, I’d do it right. Doing it with Jason and Dave? That’s it now. It’s where they come from, and they relate to it immediately. There’s church in that song.

What was the process like, now, taking a “Jive Talkin’” and a “How Deep is Your Love,” and finding its malleability so to make them country?

That wasn’t a question for Little Big Town, or for Miranda Lambert. There was never a question if those songs fit or not. Remember, there’s a version of “Jive Talkin’” by Rufus and Chaka Khan that I’ve always loved as it is much slower than the Bee Gees version. I’ve always been charmed by that laid-back groove. Much more interesting. So, this time too, we slowed it down. Relaxed it. It didn’t have to be so neurotic. That said, the Bee Gees’ version was a real reaction to who we were. Look, you can’t always know what you’re doing exactly. Gut instincts count. Naiveté is important, much more than we think. The greatest thing about making music is that it all looks great, but you don’t know how it will wind up. 

That’s got to be a poetic metaphor for something. Who did you like within the country/folk milieu of your early days?

The year we got to Australia, 1958, I loved the music of Bunny O’Keefe. You couldn’t follow him on stage. He really ripped it up. I loved Johnny Cash’s “Teenage Queen.” And the Everlys. They were a bluegrass family before they were a vocal duo. We were a folk group. Before that, we were a comedy trio. In Australia, we used to play working men’s clubs, returned solider clubs and hotels, and you had to have humor in your act.

Because everyone in the place was drinking.

Exactly. If you could cheer them up while they punched each other in the face — pretty typical of Australian clubs — you were OK. I’ve seen whole clubs erupt — the piano in the pool. The mess. Everything. It’s all going in the book, trust me.


So there’s an autobiography and at least two more volumes of Gibbsongs that you’ve alluded to, coming up. Producer Graham King from “Bohemian Rhapsody” is famously planning a musical biopic of you and your brothers. Where does that come in?

That’s confirmed, and in motion with a great team of people: Amblin, Paramount, Stacey Schneider and Graham King.

Who do you see playing you? Bradley Cooper’s name has been dropped here and there.

Oh, come on now. The suggestions you see online that are out there make me laugh, but they’re not made by me. Bradley Cooper? C’mon. I’m not that vain. I can’t imagine anybody right now. What I’m going to do is make sure that the true personalities of my brothers come through. I’ll work with the screenwriter to ensure that this is the Robin, Maurice and Andy you remember. They’ll figure me out, one way or another.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Teyana Taylor Drops Her First Collection With PrettyLittleThing

https://www.complex.com/style/2021/01/teyana-taylor-prettylittlething-collection

Teyana Taylor Drops Her First Collection With PrettyLittleThing

Teyana Taylor may have announced her retirement from music following issues with her record label, but her artistic career is far from over. As a new creative director for PrettyLittleThing, the Harlem native has released her debut collection with the online British retailer. 

The capsule is inspired by Taylor’s own signature style which pays homage to ‘90s icons and “encapsulates female sexuality, allowing you to own your confidence and be proud of who you are,” according to the brand’s site.

“I wanted the collection to be fun and reflect the way I dress,” Taylor told BET. “The new collection is where girly and tomboy meets.”

Designed by Taylor herself, the 25-piece collection features a range of baggy pants, tight body suits, bodycon printed dresses, and couture-inspired outerwear. The line also includes vegan faux leather items, pops of neon, and chocolatey browns. 

1-taylor
Image via PrettyLittleThing

“Do you remember back then when everything fit cute? It was talkin’. It was doing what it had to do,” she said of the collection. “Well, I wanted my new collection to have that classic ’90s feel and look to it. I have some vegan leather looks that are very Jean Paul Gaultier meets hip hop and R&B ’90s streetwear.”

This is Taylor’s first drop in her year-long partnership with PrettyLittleThing, where the multi-hyphenate hopes to elevate the brand.

“Being the creative director of PrettyLittleThing is very exciting,” she explained. “It is a lot that I want to do, and there are some changes that I want to make to better the company. I am a very hands-on person, and when I’m invested in something, I want to know everything.”

You can shop Teyana Taylor’s new collection on PrettyLittleThing.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Country Singer Lily Rose Signs With Big Loud and Republic, Debuts Video for iTunes Chart-Topper ‘Villain’ (EXCLUSIVE)

https://variety.com/2021/music/news/lily-rose-signs-big-loud-republic-records-villain-video-1234891429/

Country Singer Lily Rose Signs With Big Loud and Republic, Debuts Video for iTunes Chart-Topper ‘Villain’ (EXCLUSIVE)

The Big Loud/Republic Records team, which currently has what is far and away the biggest album in the country with Morgan Wallen’s “Dangerous: The Double Album,” is celebrating that success by joining with Back Blocks in signing Lily Rose, the partnership’s first shot at breaking a female artist in country music.

But in a very real sense, Rose has already “broken” herself, if radio play isn’t the sole metric: Her song “Villain” became a TikTok sensation before it was ever officially out as a single, When it was released Dec. 15 on the independent Back Blocks label, it debuted at No. 1 on iTunes’ all-genre chart and spent several weeks on and off at the top there, topping the Christmas-song competition for most of the month. (Needless to say, if it was topping the overall chart, it was also No. 1 at country as well.) Big Loud took the lead in an aggressive competition among Nashville’s major labels over the holiday season for Rose’s services .

Rose is planning sessions with some of Music Row’s top writers to come up with additional material for what will be her debut album, but in the meantime, today she’s releasing the music video for “Villain” (below).

 

With the ink still drying on her contract, Variety spoke with Rose about why she went with this label team, and become as close a thing as there is to a real overnight sensation after a good number of years of going at it in her native Atlanta and eventually Nashville.

With presumably a lot of labels taking interest in you, what was attractive about this deal?

ROSE: After signing the single deal with Back Blocks Music and Rakiyah Marshall, when the song was just hanging out at No. 1 on iTunes for so long, we knew that the label deals were going to be starting to roll in, and we had ‘em all slotted, and it was kind of just that feeling of looking for my champions. The money was not something super, super important to mem or the legacy; it was finding the right champion and the right family. I felt that off right off the bat with Big Loud, and then immediately Seth (England) brought in Monte and Avery (Lipman) and Republic, and there was a mutual want for each other, even through the holidays. They really fought for me, and I was very thrilled, because Big Loud has been my dream label since I moved here four years ago.

Why was it your dream label?

I mean, they’ve only been around for five years, but their ability to break artists, first of all — and they haven’t gotten to break a female yet. And I’m very competitive, and I like to be the first in a lot of things, and I think I’m going to have the opportunity to get that. And they’ve got Morgan and Hardy and so many artists that they’ve just kind of let them be them. The authenticity is first and the songs are second, and those are my one and two that I hold true to in my career as well. So I was very drawn to that.

Even through COVID and Zooms and everything, it was a no-excuses situation with Seth where it was “We have no reason not to have everybody on a Zoom call with her on Dec. 23 and lawyers negotiating on Christmas Day.” And then he brought in Monte and Avery soon after. He also had all of the teams on every single Zoom, too — not just A&R but marketing and all of the VPs on the ground. Those were the only VPs I’ve met in town. Everybody else, it was just the A&R team. 

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Top Row: Avery Lipman (Co-founder/president, Republic Records), Tyler Arnold (EVP A&R, Republic Records), Seth England (CEO, Big Loud) Bottom Row: Lily Rose, Monte Lipman (Co-founder/CEO, Republic Records), Rakiyah Marshall (CEO, Back Blocks Music)
Courtesy Republic Records

Can you describe the timeline of December? It was a very short timeline with a lot of notches in it.

Timeline-wise, the song went viral on Dec. 1, and I sdecided the deal with Rakiyah and Back Blocks on the 2nd. And we were like, well, we’ve got to get this out (commercially) before Christmas. So Dec, 15 was the release date, but it was right around the 9th or 10th when the labels started rolling in. Our pre-save numbers were insane, and they couldn’t see that, but I think they saw the traction. And we were very, very adamant that we were not taking a single meeting until the song was released. So on Wednesday, Dec. 16 through that Friday, I think we met with 13 different labels in three days. [Laughs.] Which is crazy.

I had three meetings with Big Loud between Dec. 16 and Dec. 23. That’s how badly Seth and the whole entire team were like, “We don’t care if we’re with our families or anything. We will be on these Zoom calls, selling what we can do for you.” And I was trying to keep my poker face on and my hand very close to me that they were my dream label, you know — it was a very mutual longing and want for each other.

We shot the video on Dec. 22. We have seen how these songs and these moments on TikTok or whatever can make something go viral and have a moment where you’re like: “We need to capitalize on this as soon as possible, so when the new year rolls around and Morgan’s stuff kind of evens out, we can release it and just have stuff ready to go.”

When did you actually sign the deal?

It was Thursday, Jan, 7. The offer was all set on New Year’s Day. But I’ve been working at this for 13 years, since I’ve been starting to write songs; it’s eight years that I’ve really been chasing it professionally. And I expressed to Seth how important it was to me that, even if it was just me and him and Rakiyah in the photo, that (it was important) having that (signing) photo not (just be) on Zoom. I moved up here for this picture. And he got all the COVID testing and everything done so we could take that dream photo (below), so I’m super appreciative of that.

 

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Back Row: Jeff Tanner (VP, Business Affairs, Big Loud), Matt Cottingham, (Ritholz Levy Fields LLP), Stacy Blythe (VP Promotion, Big Loud), Rakiyah Marshall (CEO, Back Blocks Music), Lily Rose, Seth England (CEO, Big Loud), Candice Watkins (VP Marketing, Big Loud), Joey Moi (Partner, Big Loud) Front Row: Paul Logan (VP Sync & Visual Strategy, Big Loud), Daira Eamon, Patch Culbertson (VP A&R, Big Loud), Austen Adams (COO, Big Loud)
Chris Hornbuckle

That the song did what it did with no promotion speaks to the power one song can have.

Yeah, I mean, we all get into music to try to replicate the feelings and the sonic feelings that songs can do for us. You know, I went to my first Bruce Springsteen concert at 9 years old, and I’ve been trying to replicate that energy on stage ever since. But I think that the power of songs and truth and grit behind country music specifically is what makes this format so special, and it helped “Villain” just reach the top of so much content and so much talent these days that people connected with it.

Talk about the video, because there’s a storyline to it, and you didn’t go with the ins-and-outs-of-a relationship video, or just you singing alone by yourself.

Yeah. The coolest thing about TikTok and social media is the connection with fans. It lends a hand for them to be able to give their opinions, and when I read the comments about “Villain” and why people were connecting with it — first thought, you immediately go to the romantic relationship, or the detriment of a romantic relationship. But “Villain” also has just been tapping into this vein of friendships ending, or even mother-daughter relationships that are not doing well. There are just so many different things. So I was kind of like, you know what? If you listen to the lyrics of “Villain,” I don’t want to give any power to the ex, to the person we wrote the song about on the romantic side. So let’s just do a video that essentially does not give any power to the people we wrote the song about.

How would you describe the story that’s depicted in the video?

Oh man. It appears that a cop is going around looking for a bad guy and the (twist) is, I’m a dirty cop and I’m really just looking for the money. So the hero the entire time is actually the villain. It’s kind of the antithesis of the actual lyric.

What happens from here?

One of the reasons I’m so excited already to be a part of this team is they just put out the biggest double album in country history and it’s doing insane numbers, and they’re still finding time to figure out my stuff. So I think the next chapter of all of this is we’re gonna hopefully send it to radio. You know, that’s a dream. And if the numbers can hold up, we can get an add date. And then also just finding more music. I’m writing like crazy right now, while also building a team and trying to find what the next single could be ‚ and what the next few singles could be — and also trying to form a record to eventually put out. I’ve been writing for so long with the same crew, and we have a lot of great songs that are up for debate. But I’m also meeting so many new writers on the Row and just trying to get me in as many rooms as possible, so we have as many songs to choose from as we can. We’re in good hands.

 

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ENTERTAINMENT

XXXTentacion’s Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

https://www.complex.com/music/2021/01/xxxtentacion-mom-posts-birthday-tribute-for-late-rapper

XXXTentacion's Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

XXXTentacion‘s mom pays tribute to the later rapper on what would’ve been his 23rd birthday.

On Saturday morning, Cleopatra Bernard shared an Instagram photo of her son with a mic in his hand and his “Cleopatra” chest tattoo on display. Bernard captioned the post: “Happy Birthday 23 on the 23rd. We never miss the signs you show us. Doing our best to continue everything you started, I love you beyond words ❤️ see you in the next life.”

Saturday marked XXX’s third birthday since his death on June 18, 2018, when he was gunned down outside a motorcycle dealership in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Four men—Robert Allen, Michael Boatwright, Trayvon Newsome, and Dedrick Williams—have since been indicted in the shooting death of XXX; they are now awaiting trial on charges of first-degree murder with a firearm and armed robbery with a firearm.

XXX’s friends, fans, and former collaborators also took to social media to remember the rapper on his 23rd birthday. You can check out some of the posts below.

Ski Mask's XXX Tribute

Lil Pump's XXX Tribute

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ENTERTAINMENT

XXXTentacion’s Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

https://www.complex.com/music/2021/01/xxxtentacion-mom-posts-birthday-tribute-for-late-rapper

XXXTentacion's Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

XXXTentacion‘s mom pays tribute to the later rapper on what would’ve been his 23rd birthday.

On Saturday morning, Cleopatra Bernard shared an Instagram photo of her son with a mic in his hand and his “Cleopatra” chest tattoo on display. Bernard captioned the post: “Happy Birthday 23 on the 23rd. We never miss the signs you show us. Doing our best to continue everything you started, I love you beyond words ❤️ see you in the next life.”

Saturday marked XXX’s third birthday since his death on June 18, 2018, when he was gunned down outside a motorcycle dealership in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Four men—Robert Allen, Michael Boatwright, Trayvon Newsome, and Dedrick Williams—have since been indicted in the shooting death of XXX; they are now awaiting trial on charges of first-degree murder with a firearm and armed robbery with a firearm.

XXX’s friends, fans, and former collaborators also took to social media to remember the rapper on his 23rd birthday. You can check out some of the posts below.

Ski Mask's XXX Tribute

Lil Pump's XXX Tribute

Continue Reading

ENTERTAINMENT

XXXTentacion’s Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

https://www.complex.com/music/2021/01/xxxtentacion-mom-posts-birthday-tribute-for-late-rapper

XXXTentacion's Mom Posts Birthday Tribute for the Late Rapper

XXXTentacion‘s mom pays tribute to the later rapper on what would’ve been his 23rd birthday.

On Saturday morning, Cleopatra Bernard shared an Instagram photo of her son with a mic in his hand and his “Cleopatra” chest tattoo on display. Bernard captioned the post: “Happy Birthday 23 on the 23rd. We never miss the signs you show us. Doing our best to continue everything you started, I love you beyond words ❤️ see you in the next life.”

Saturday marked XXX’s third birthday since his death on June 18, 2018, when he was gunned down outside a motorcycle dealership in Deerfield Beach, Florida. Four men—Robert Allen, Michael Boatwright, Trayvon Newsome, and Dedrick Williams—have since been indicted in the shooting death of XXX; they are now awaiting trial on charges of first-degree murder with a firearm and armed robbery with a firearm.

XXX’s friends, fans, and former collaborators also took to social media to remember the rapper on his 23rd birthday. You can check out some of the posts below.

Ski Mask's XXX Tribute

Lil Pump's XXX Tribute

Continue Reading

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