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COVID-19 in Wisconsin: 5,753 deaths – WISN Milwaukee

https://www.wisn.com/article/covid-wisconsin-death-toll-by-county-and-headlines-jan25/35308631

COVID-19 in Wisconsin: 5,753 deaths - WISN Milwaukee

ADDITIONAL ONE-POINT-FOUR MILLION DOSES WILL BE SENT OUT TO STATES NEXT WEEK. PATRICK: WISCONSIN REPORTED MORE THAN 1300 NEW CORONAVIRUS CASES TODAY, AS WELL AS 54 MORE DEATHS CONNECTED TO THE VIRUS. THE STATE’S SEVEN-DAY AVERAGE NEW CASES DROPPED AGAIN TODAY TO 15

COVID-19 in Wisconsin: 5,753 deaths

Get the latest information on the coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Wisconsin and resources to keep you and your family safe and prepared.

Get the latest information on the coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Wisconsin and resources to keep you and your family safe and prepared. Continuing Coverage: Coronavirus in WisconsinStatistics:At least 5,753 patients have died so far At least 362,505 vaccines have been administered as of TuesdayAt least 535,218 patients have tested positive for the coronavirus in Wisconsin since the outbreak began.93,768 patients in Milwaukee County — 1,122 deaths38,608 patients in Waukesha County — 429 deaths37,352 patients in Dane County — 240 deaths28,956 patients in Brown County — 190 deaths19,623 patients in Racine County — 293 deaths18,128 patients in Outagamie County — 176 deaths16,376 patients in Winnebago County — 166 deaths14,057 patients in Kenosha County — 265 deaths 13,597 patients in Rock County — 137 deaths 13,162 patients in Marathon County — 169 deaths13,125 patients in Washington County — 119 deaths12,358 patients in Sheboygan County — 112 deaths11,439 patients in Fond du Lac County — 80 deaths11,417 patients in La Crosse County — 70 deaths 11,071 patients in Dodge County — 142 deaths 10,389 patients in Eau Claire County — 97 deaths8,503 patients in Walworth County — 116 deaths7,462 patients in Jefferson County — 68 deaths7,241 patients in Ozaukee County — 70 deaths6,839 patients in Manitowoc County — 60 deaths6,710 patients in Chippewa County — 77 deaths6,280 patients in Wood County — 65 deaths6,052 patients in Portage County — 58 deaths6,034 patients in St. Croix County — 39 deaths5,158 patients in Calumet County — 39 deaths5,043 patients in Barron County — 69 deaths 5,007 patients in Sauk County — 35 deaths 4,757 patients in Columbia County — 39 deaths4,574 patients in Waupaca County — 104 deaths 4,467 patients in Shawano County — 67 deaths 4,425 patients in Grant County — 78 deaths4,115 patients in Oconto County — 45 deaths4,016 patients in Monroe County — 30 deaths 3,972 patients in Dunn County — 26 deaths 3,872 patients in Marinette County — 58 deaths3,506 patients in Polk County — 41 deaths 3,495 patients in Douglas County — 18 deaths3,259 patients in Pierce County — 32 deaths 3,253 patients in Trempealeau County — 34 deaths3,109 patients in Oneida County — 55 deaths 3,068 patients in Clark County — 56 deaths 2,856 patients in Juneau County — 17 deaths 2,771 patients in Lincoln County — 54 deaths2,636 patients in Green County — 12 deaths 2,535 patients in Jackson County — 21 deaths 2,328 patients in Door County — 18 deaths 2,317 patients in Kewaunee County — 26 deaths 2,033 patients in Waushara County — 25 deaths1,882 patients in Langlade County — 31 deaths1,877 patients in Vilas County — 31 deaths 1,779 patients in Iowa County — 9 deaths1,741 patients in Taylor County — 20 deaths1,715 patients in Vernon County — 33 deaths 1,629 patients in Crawford County — 15 deaths1,480 patients in Green Lake County — 14 deaths1,473 patients in Adams County — 11 deaths1,390 patients in Sawyer County — 17 deaths 1,355 patients in Lafayette County — 7 deaths 1,243 patients in Marquette County — 21 deaths1,239 patients in Buffalo County — 7 deaths 1,217 patients in Rusk County — 14 deaths 1,209 patients in Richland County — 13 deaths 1,206 patients in Washburn County — 16 deaths 1,125 patients in Ashland County — 16 deaths 1,086 patients in Burnett County — 23 deaths1,079 patients in Price County — 7 deaths1,028 patients in Bayfield County — 18 deaths901 patients in Forest County — 22 deaths783 patients in Menominee County — 11 deaths774 patients in Pepin County — 7 deaths471 patients in Iron County — 19 deaths417 patients in Florence County — 12 deaths Deaths have been reported in all 72 Wisconsin counties.At least 415 coronavirus cases have now been reported in all 72 Wisconsin counties.As of Tuesday afternoon, at least 507,760 people in Wisconsin have recovered from the coronavirus. At least 2,481,735 patients have tested negative in Wisconsin.4.5% of patients have ever been hospitalized.There were no patients in the 530-bed Alternate Care Facility at State Fair Park on Tuesday.As of Tuesday afternoon, at least 25,362,700 Americans have tested positive for the coronavirus.At least 423,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus, as of Tuesday afternoon.What’s New: Week of Jan. 25, 2021:Top aides to President Joe Biden have begun talks with a group of moderate Senate Republicans and Democrats on a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. Biden’s plan calls for making direct $1,400 payments to Americans, but senators from both parties raised questions about the stimulus checks. Biden will formally reinstate COVID-19 travel restrictions on non-U.S. travelers from Brazil, Ireland, the United Kingdom and 26 other European countries that allow travel across open borders, according to two White House officials. South Africa is expected to be added to the restricted list because of concerns about a variant of the virus that has spread beyond that nation.The Miami Heat basketball team will be attempting to have fans at the American Airlines Arena with an assist from some dogs. The Heat will use coronavirus-sniffing dogs to screen fans who want to attend their games. They’ve been working on the plan for months, and the highly trained dogs have been in place for some games this season where the team has allowed a handful of guests.15 Days to Slow the Spread: CLICK HERE to read the CDC guidelines on coronavirusMobile app users, click here to view the map.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What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:Fever or chillsCoughShortness of breath or difficulty breathingFatigueMuscle or body achesHeadacheNew loss of taste or smellSore throatCongestion or runny noseNausea or vomitingDiarrheaThis list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.Should I get tested for COVID-19?The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:have symptoms of COVID-19.have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.The FDA has also approved a test for COVID-19 that you can take at home. The test kits are available for purchase on Amazon with a turnaround time for results of 24 to 72 hours after the sample is shipped and received.Emergency care for COVID-19 symptoms:The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:Trouble breathingPersistent pain or pressure in the chestNew confusionInability to wake or stay awakeBluish lips or faceThis list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.Who is most at risk for coronavirus?Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu.Another difference is there is a vaccine to protect against the flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.Educational resources for online learning in Wisconsin during coronavirusGet breaking news alerts with the WISN 12 app.Follow us: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube

Get the latest information on the coronavirus, or COVID-19, in Wisconsin and resources to keep you and your family safe and prepared.

Continuing Coverage: Coronavirus in Wisconsin

Statistics:

  • At least 5,753 patients have died so far
  • At least 362,505 vaccines have been administered as of Tuesday
  • At least 535,218 patients have tested positive for the coronavirus in Wisconsin since the outbreak began.
    • 93,768 patients in Milwaukee County — 1,122 deaths
    • 38,608 patients in Waukesha County — 429 deaths
    • 37,352 patients in Dane County — 240 deaths
    • 28,956 patients in Brown County — 190 deaths
    • 19,623 patients in Racine County — 293 deaths
    • 18,128 patients in Outagamie County — 176 deaths
    • 16,376 patients in Winnebago County — 166 deaths
    • 14,057 patients in Kenosha County — 265 deaths
    • 13,597 patients in Rock County — 137 deaths
    • 13,162 patients in Marathon County — 169 deaths
    • 13,125 patients in Washington County — 119 deaths
    • 12,358 patients in Sheboygan County — 112 deaths
    • 11,439 patients in Fond du Lac County — 80 deaths
    • 11,417 patients in La Crosse County — 70 deaths
    • 11,071 patients in Dodge County — 142 deaths
    • 10,389 patients in Eau Claire County — 97 deaths
    • 8,503 patients in Walworth County — 116 deaths
    • 7,462 patients in Jefferson County — 68 deaths
    • 7,241 patients in Ozaukee County — 70 deaths
    • 6,839 patients in Manitowoc County — 60 deaths
    • 6,710 patients in Chippewa County — 77 deaths
    • 6,280 patients in Wood County — 65 deaths
    • 6,052 patients in Portage County — 58 deaths
    • 6,034 patients in St. Croix County — 39 deaths
    • 5,158 patients in Calumet County — 39 deaths
    • 5,043 patients in Barron County — 69 deaths
    • 5,007 patients in Sauk County — 35 deaths
    • 4,757 patients in Columbia County — 39 deaths
    • 4,574 patients in Waupaca County — 104 deaths
    • 4,467 patients in Shawano County — 67 deaths
    • 4,425 patients in Grant County — 78 deaths
    • 4,115 patients in Oconto County — 45 deaths
    • 4,016 patients in Monroe County — 30 deaths
    • 3,972 patients in Dunn County — 26 deaths
    • 3,872 patients in Marinette County — 58 deaths
    • 3,506 patients in Polk County — 41 deaths
    • 3,495 patients in Douglas County — 18 deaths
    • 3,259 patients in Pierce County — 32 deaths
    • 3,253 patients in Trempealeau County — 34 deaths
    • 3,109 patients in Oneida County — 55 deaths
    • 3,068 patients in Clark County — 56 deaths
    • 2,856 patients in Juneau County — 17 deaths
    • 2,771 patients in Lincoln County — 54 deaths
    • 2,636 patients in Green County — 12 deaths
    • 2,535 patients in Jackson County — 21 deaths
    • 2,328 patients in Door County — 18 deaths
    • 2,317 patients in Kewaunee County — 26 deaths
    • 2,033 patients in Waushara County — 25 deaths
    • 1,882 patients in Langlade County — 31 deaths
    • 1,877 patients in Vilas County — 31 deaths
    • 1,779 patients in Iowa County — 9 deaths
    • 1,741 patients in Taylor County — 20 deaths
    • 1,715 patients in Vernon County — 33 deaths
    • 1,629 patients in Crawford County — 15 deaths
    • 1,480 patients in Green Lake County — 14 deaths
    • 1,473 patients in Adams County — 11 deaths
    • 1,390 patients in Sawyer County — 17 deaths
    • 1,355 patients in Lafayette County — 7 deaths
    • 1,243 patients in Marquette County — 21 deaths
    • 1,239 patients in Buffalo County — 7 deaths
    • 1,217 patients in Rusk County — 14 deaths
    • 1,209 patients in Richland County — 13 deaths
    • 1,206 patients in Washburn County — 16 deaths
    • 1,125 patients in Ashland County — 16 deaths
    • 1,086 patients in Burnett County — 23 deaths
    • 1,079 patients in Price County — 7 deaths
    • 1,028 patients in Bayfield County — 18 deaths
    • 901 patients in Forest County — 22 deaths
    • 783 patients in Menominee County — 11 deaths
    • 774 patients in Pepin County — 7 deaths
    • 471 patients in Iron County — 19 deaths
    • 417 patients in Florence County — 12 deaths
  • Deaths have been reported in all 72 Wisconsin counties.
  • At least 415 coronavirus cases have now been reported in all 72 Wisconsin counties.
  • As of Tuesday afternoon, at least 507,760 people in Wisconsin have recovered from the coronavirus.
  • At least 2,481,735 patients have tested negative in Wisconsin.
  • 4.5% of patients have ever been hospitalized.
  • There were no patients in the 530-bed Alternate Care Facility at State Fair Park on Tuesday.
  • As of Tuesday afternoon, at least 25,362,700 Americans have tested positive for the coronavirus.
  • At least 423,000 Americans have died from the coronavirus, as of Tuesday afternoon.

What’s New: Week of Jan. 25, 2021:

  • Top aides to President Joe Biden have begun talks with a group of moderate Senate Republicans and Democrats on a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. Biden’s plan calls for making direct $1,400 payments to Americans, but senators from both parties raised questions about the stimulus checks.
  • Biden will formally reinstate COVID-19 travel restrictions on non-U.S. travelers from Brazil, Ireland, the United Kingdom and 26 other European countries that allow travel across open borders, according to two White House officials. South Africa is expected to be added to the restricted list because of concerns about a variant of the virus that has spread beyond that nation.
  • The Miami Heat basketball team will be attempting to have fans at the American Airlines Arena with an assist from some dogs. The Heat will use coronavirus-sniffing dogs to screen fans who want to attend their games. They’ve been working on the plan for months, and the highly trained dogs have been in place for some games this season where the team has allowed a handful of guests.

15 Days to Slow the Spread: CLICK HERE to read the CDC guidelines on coronavirus

Mobile app users, click here to view the map.





What are the symptoms of COVID-19/coronavirus?

Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these are the symptoms you should watch out for:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

This list does not include all possible symptoms. CDC will continue to update this list as they learn more about the virus.

Should I get tested for COVID-19?

The CDC recommends that you should consider taking a COVID-19 test if you:

  • have symptoms of COVID-19.
  • have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.
  • have been asked or referred to get testing by their healthcare provider, local/external icon or state ​health department.

    The FDA has also approved a test for COVID-19 that you can take at home. The test kits are available for purchase on Amazon with a turnaround time for results of 24 to 72 hours after the sample is shipped and received.

Emergency care for COVID-19 symptoms:

The CDC says to look for emergency warning signs for coronavirus. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

This list is not all possible symptoms. Call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility: Notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

Who is most at risk for coronavirus?

Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms of COVID-19, according to the CDC.

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

Flu or COVID-19. What’s the difference between them?

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. That’s when testing may be needed to help confirm a diagnosis.

There are some key differences between flu and COVID-19. The CDC says it seems COVID-19 spreads more easily than flu and causes more serious illnesses in some people. It can also take longer before people show symptoms of COVID-19 and people can be contagious for a longer period of time than the flu.

Another difference is there is a vaccine to protect against the flu. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus.

Educational resources for online learning in Wisconsin during coronavirus

Get breaking news alerts with the WISN 12 app.
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California To Give 40% Of Vaccine Doses To Vulnerable Areas – HuffPost

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/california-vaccine-doses-vulnerable-areas_n_6040aafcc5b6ff75ac4198d7

California To Give 40% Of Vaccine Doses To Vulnerable Areas - HuffPost

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will begin setting aside 40% of all vaccine doses for the state’s most vulnerable neighborhoods in an effort to inoculate people most at risk from the coronavirus and get the state’s economy open more quickly.

Two officials in Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration shared details Wednesday on condition of anonymity.

The doses will be spread out among 400 ZIP codes with about 8 million people eligible for shots. Many of the neighborhoods are concentrated in Los Angeles County and the Central Valley. The areas are considered most vulnerable based on metrics such as household income, education level, housing status and access to transportation.

Once 2 million vaccine doses are given out in those neighborhoods, the state will make it easier for counties to move through reopening tiers that dictate business and school reopenings.

Right now, a county can move from the most restrictive purple tier to the lower red tier based on several metrics, including having 7 or fewer new COVID cases per 100,000 people per day over a period of several weeks. That metric will change to 10 new cases or fewer. In the red tier, businesses such as restaurants and gyms can open for indoor services at limited capacity.

Also in the red tier, schools that want to access new state funding must provide in-person learning for students in transitional kindergarten through grade 6 and at least one grade each in middle and high school.

About 1.6 million vaccine doses already have been given to people in those 400 ZIP codes, and the state will hit the 2 million mark in the next week or two, officials said.

Jaimie Mitchell, left, screens Fulerun Begum at a vaccination site opened by St. John's Well Child and Family Center at East



Jaimie Mitchell, left, screens Fulerun Begum at a vaccination site opened by St. John’s Well Child and Family Center at East Los Angeles Civic Center on March 3, 2021 in Los Angeles.

Once the state gives out 4 million doses in those neighborhoods, it will revise the metrics for getting into the even less restrictive orange and yellow tiers.

Newsom has called equity the state’s “North Star.” Yet community health clinics focused on serving low-income and vulnerable Californians say they haven’t been getting enough doses.

The changes mark a fresh round of twists in California’s vaccination and reopening plans. People age 65 and over, farmworkers, educators and emergency service workers are also eligible for shots.

More counties have already been moving into the red tier as caseloads, hospitalizations and deaths drop. The state’s average 2.2% test positivity rate over 7 days is a record low.

Officials are making it easier to move through reopening tiers, arguing the likelihood of widespread transmission that can overwhelm hospitals will decrease as more people are vaccinated. That’s particularly true as the most vulnerable populations that are more likely to get seriously ill receive the shots.

While race and ethnicity are not explicit factors in designating vaccinations, the 400 vulnerable ZIP codes overlap heavily with neighborhoods with higher populations of Blacks, Latinos and Asian and Pacific Islanders, officials said.

Los Angeles County could move into the next phase of reopening with fewer restrictions as early as next week, though any actual lifting of coronavirus-related constraints would not happen immediately, county officials said earlier Wednesday.

Most San Francisco Bay Area counties have advanced to the next phase, which allows restaurants and movie theaters to open indoors at 25% capacity and gyms to operate at 10% capacity.

A HuffPost Guide To Coronavirus

As COVID-19 cases rise, it’s more important than ever to remain connected and informed. Join the HuffPost community today. (It’s free!)

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Most coronavirus deaths have occurred in countries where majority of adults are overweight – Washington Post

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/03/04/coronavirus-overweight-global-report/

Most coronavirus deaths have occurred in countries where majority of adults are overweight - Washington Post

Among the nations with overweight populations above the 50 percent threshold were also those with some of the largest proportions of coronavirus deaths — including countries such as Britain, Italy and the United States. Some 2.5 million people have died around the world of covid-19, more than 517,000 of which were in the United States.

In some cases, the correlations between coronavirus severity and weight are also tied to racial and ethnic inequality. In the United States, “Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black adults have a higher prevalence of obesity and are more likely to suffer worse outcomes from COVID-19,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report found that in countries where less than half of the adult population is classified as overweight, the likelihood of death from covid-19 was about one-tenth of the levels in countries with higher shares of overweight adults. A higher BMI was also associated with increased risk of hospitalization, admission to intensive or critical care and the need for mechanically assisted ventilation.

In Britain, overweight coronavirus patients were 67 percent more likely to require intensive care, and obese patients three times likelier.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who was hospitalized and required oxygen therapy after contracting the disease last spring, has campaigned in recent months for Britons to lose weight to reduce health risks and support the country’s overburdened National Health Service.

Speaking last year, Johnson said he had long struggled with his weight and was “too fat” when he was sickened with the disease that has claimed more than 124,000 lives in the United Kingdom. He is often spotted out running near his home in central London alongside his personal trainer.

The World Obesity Federation findings were near-uniform across the globe, the report said, and found that increased body weight was the second greatest predictor after old age of hospitalization and higher risk of death of covid-19.

As a result, the London-based federation urged governments to prioritize overweight people for coronavirus testing and vaccinations.

The United Nations warned in 2020 that obesity is a “global pandemic in its own right.”

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Health & Fitness

President Bidens New Malaria Czar Is Dr. Raj Panjabi : Goats and Soda – NPR

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2021/03/04/971859710/new-u-s-malaria-czar-why-we-should-care-about-the-disease-even-in-a-pandemic

President Bidens New Malaria Czar Is Dr. Raj Panjabi : Goats and Soda - NPR
President Bidens New Malaria Czar Is Dr. Raj Panjabi : Goats and Soda - NPR

Dr. Raj Panjabi, the newly named head of the President’s Malaria Initiative, treating patients during a visit to Liberia, where he was born and lived until 1990. He’ll lead the effort to prevent and treat malaria around the world. Each year, some 400,000 people die of a disease that, he notes, is “preventable and treatable.”

Gabriel Diamond/Skoll Foundation


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Gabriel Diamond/Skoll Foundation

President Bidens New Malaria Czar Is Dr. Raj Panjabi : Goats and Soda - NPR

Dr. Raj Panjabi, the newly named head of the President’s Malaria Initiative, treating patients during a visit to Liberia, where he was born and lived until 1990. He’ll lead the effort to prevent and treat malaria around the world. Each year, some 400,000 people die of a disease that, he notes, is “preventable and treatable.”

Gabriel Diamond/Skoll Foundation

Here’s a few things you probably didn’t know about malaria and the U.S.

At least eight U.S. presidents had it, including George Washington (infected in Virginia), Abraham Lincoln (infected in Illinois) and John F. Kennedy (infected in the Solomon Islands during World War II).

The current U.S. caseload is zero (with the exception of Americans who contract the disease abroad).

The U.S. actually has a malaria czar: the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator for the President’s Malaria Initiative, overseeing an annual budget of $770 million. The goal of the initiative is to wipe out this potentially fatal disease, spread by mosquitoes, which infects some 220 million people a year.

And now there’s a new malaria coordinator. In February, President Joe Biden appointed Dr. Raj Panjabi, an instructor at Harvard Medical School and the founder of Last Mile Health, which aims to bring health care to hard-to-reach places. In 2017, he won the $1 million TED annual award given to an “exceptional individual with a creative and bold vision to solve a timely, pressing problem.”

Malaria is a disease Panjabi is all too familiar with. He had it a couple of times as a kid growing up in Liberia where his parents, Indian immigrants, had settled before fleeing civil war in 1989 and eventually coming to the U.S.

We spoke to Panjabi about his new position. The interview has been edited for clarity and length.

What made you want to take on malaria as a health challenge?

Traveling to Liberia as an American medical student, I saw the relief on the faces of parents whose children were dying from this preventable and treatable disease – and who survived after being treated by medicines and health workers supported by programs that the President’s Malaria Initiative had been building.

That’s why, when I was asked by Biden to take on this role, I couldn’t say no. I know how impactful this [U.S.] program has been.

For those of us unfamiliar with the arc of the disease, can you share your childhood memories?

The first time, I was a 13-month-old. I got it again when I was 6 years old. I don’t want to gross folks out but it’s like an intense version of the flu: vomiting, fever, diarrhea. I remember vomiting a spew on the floor of my parents’ bedroom, having to be cared for by mom for a good two to three days before the [anti-malarial] medicine started to work.

That experience for a parent and a child is the lived experience of hundreds of millions of people every day.

And malaria takes the lives of 400,000 people a year still — many of them children, the way I was when I got it.

But it’s no longer a problem in the U.S., correct?

During the civil war there were 1.3 million cases of malaria and 10,000 deaths among soldiers and civilians. Up until the early 1950s, it was still prevalent in the American South.

And now …

It’s been not only eliminated from the U.S., but in countries in Latin America and southeast Asia it’s either been eliminated or on the brink [of elimination]. [Editor’s note: This week, El Salvador announced that, with support from the U.S., it had joined the malaria-free club.]

How did the U.S. do it?

The spraying of chemicals that killed the mosquitoes and also improvements in social and economic conditions — housing improved, workers began spending more time indoors.

What would it take to stop deaths and wipe out malaria in the rest of the world?

That same holistic approach: tests, treatments, indoor spraying on walls so the mosquitoes die, bed nets with the same [anti-mosquito] chemicals.

Yet it seems as if it’s easy for those in well-off countries to forget about malaria altogether.

There is a bias in global health. When a disease becomes a disease of poverty, those who are powerful may not pay as much attention. That said, it would be such a mistake to think taking our foot off the gas in responding to malaria would be a wise thing to do. As COVID has shown, diseases are able to spread fast and furious. A health threat anywhere is threat to people everywhere.

Speaking of COVID: What’s the impact of the pandemic on malaria?

Just because COVID is infecting so many people doesn’t mean the malaria disease burden has gotten any less. It’s gotten worse because COVID has disrupted health care systems dramatically and that has put the strain on health workers and clinics, disrupted supply chains as well. We need to make sure nets and malaria tests and treatments get to people.

In this age-old battle against the coronavirus pathogen, some people doubt the need to comply with preventive measures. Are there lessons from your past work in global health that would be useful for Americans to learn?

In my career in medicine and public health, I’ve had a chance to respond to several epidemics, including Ebola, HIV, malaria and COVID-19. If I’ve learned one thing about epidemics it is this: Outbreaks start and stop in communities. People trust their neighbor. People trust those who share their lived experiences. We are more likely to defeat infectious diseases when we invest in the [health workers] closest to the outbreak as not just a part but the heart of our response.

Meanwhile, some might wonder: How can we focus on malaria in the midst of a global pandemic?

You’re getting at a deeper issue: Why care about malaria when we have COVID?

I think there are really three reasons.

First, it’s the right thing to do. We have the tools to stop the suffering.

Second, it builds health systems that keep us all safer. These armies of health workers, networks of clinics and laboratories we’ve invested in to engage in the fight against malaria also help us respond to other threats. Some of these workers are the first workers to respond to COVID and Ebola and every new pathogen.

And the third reason – maybe it sounds cheesy but I think it’s existential — is a four-letter word: hope. More people have died from infectious diseases than any other phenomenon. We are engaged in a historic fight as always between human and pathogen.

We’re at this turning point with malaria, one of the deadliest and oldest pathogens. If we lost this war against malaria, I think we create despair to fight future pandemics.

Science shows we can defeat malaria in this generation. Then we create hope we can defeat future pandemics. And at an existential level, hope matters.

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Health & Fitness

St. Louis-area hospitals may still be vaccinating seniors when 500000 more Missourians will be eligible for vaccine in mid-March – STLtoday.com

https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/st-louis-area-hospitals-may-still-be-vaccinating-seniors-when-500-000-more-missourians-will/article_42aed2ee-473d-5961-abc5-2bcd7db7c43e.html

St. Louis-area hospitals may still be vaccinating seniors when 500000 more Missourians will be eligible for vaccine in mid-March - STLtoday.com

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Health & Fitness

Covid-19 death rates 10 times higher in countries where most adults are overweight, report finds – CNN

https://www.cnn.com/2021/03/04/health/obesity-covid-death-rate-intl/index.html

Covid-19 death rates 10 times higher in countries where most adults are overweight, report finds - CNN
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